Exporting Chrome and Google Bookmarks to Evernote

Recently I started revisiting the way my data was spread across different cloud services. Up until now, I’ve been using Google Bookmarks to keep all my bookmarks, lots and lots of them, using mainly tags to keep organized. A few years ago when I decided to move from Delicious, it felt like an obvious choice. A few hiccups along the way, but so far, it worked really well. I even created a Chrome extension to help bookmarking and searching  bookmarks from the omnibar. A few things annoyed me, like presenting tags the same way as folders, all listed on the left sidebar, creating a loooong page with only links on the side.

Lately I also started bookmarking a few links on Evernote, specially references to technical articles and so on. In the spirit of simplifying, I decided to consolidate everything in the same place, Evernote. This meant I would have to migrate my 3k+ bookmarks from Google to Evernote, trying to preserve all tags and possibly creation dates.

Google Bookmarks doesn’t provide a huge list of exporting options, only one HTML format, with links grouped by tag. The interesting thing about the format is that bookmarks are duplicated if they have more than one tag. One annoying thing I would have to deal with.

Looked around for services or scripts that could help migrating, but not much luck. Most guides only suggested importing the HTML file directly to Evernote, creating one singe note, and that’s not what I wanted. Looked a little bit further and found a Python script on GitHub. Very simplistic. The script would parse the file and write the output in an Evernote format, or ENEX, a simple XML file with Evernote tags.

Tried it and it worked, at least it ran and created a new file. Tried to import it on Evernote and no luck. It failed giving no clue about what was wrong. I decided to play with the file a little bit and found the problem, a few spaces and empty lines in the wrong place. Fixed the script and import worked, sort of…

Remember I mentioned about duplicate entries on the exported file. The script did not account for that, so all entries with more than one tag were duplicated.  That would not work. Since the script was almost done, I just decided to fork it and fix this small things. Included a check for duplicated bookmarks. While I was at it, I also minified the output and included created dates to the exported fields.

If you are looking for something similar, the script is on GitHub…

https://github.com/spiermar/bookmarks2evernote

Use it, fork it, improve it. And let me know what you think! ;-)

Finding process memory usage on Linux

Recently I came up with a script to quickly print the memory utilization of specific processes on Linux. It’s very simple, but proven to be very handy while I was moving and tuning my VPSs. It quickly showed me that Apache was taking pretty much all my memory and motivated the migration to nginx.

It’s currently set to get the Resident Set Size (RSS), but you can easily change it to use Virtual Memory (VSZ). Just change ‘rss’ to ‘vsz’ in the ps commands. Also, you can add more processes to the script. Just add a new line and change the process name.

gmark-this

Dear readers,
A couple days ago I managed to make available my first Chrome extension. GMark This is a Google Bookmarks extension for Google Chrome. It aims to provide a lightweight and elegant interface between Bookmarks and Chrome by providing simple ways of bookmarking new pages and searching bookmarks. Searches are also integrated with Chrome’s Omnibox.

GMark This was motivated by the lack of a simple extension to manage Google Bookmarks on Chrome. For users with a significant amount of labels and bookmarks, using traditional options like YAGBE is not feasible. Loading all your labels on a pop-up and browsing through them is simply not efficient. That’s why GMark This aims to provide the simplest integration between Bookmarks and Chrome, without overheads.

Currently GMark This aims to provide a simple integration between Bookmarks and Chrome, thus, its features also aim to be as simple as possible.

  • New bookmark creating through a browser action button.
  • Bookmark search through Chrome’s Omnibox.

You can check it out at http://code.google.com/p/gmark-this/

Remote Shutdown/Restart on Windows

This is one of things you certainly already had to do.. You are working remotely and for some reason your session freezes (Windows, you know) and you can’t do anything.. Usually you would ask for a colleague that seats nearby to hard reboot your desktop, but what happens when that is not possible???

Now, how to perform a remote shutdown/restart on a Windows box:

  1. Open Computer Management (Local)
    In the console tree, right-click Computer Management (Local), and then click Connect to another computer.
  2. In the Select Computer dialog box, click Another computer, type the name of the computer that you want to restart or shut down, and then click OK. You can also click Browse to search for the name of the computer.
  3. In the console tree, right-click Computer Management (Remote computer name), and then click Properties.
  4. On the Advanced tab, click Startup and Recovery.
  5. Click Shut Down to open the Shut Down dialog box.
  6. Under Action, select the actions you want to perform on the computer to which you are connected.
  7. Under Force Apps Closed, select the circumstances under which you want to force applications to close when you shut down or restart the computer, and then click OK.

Note

  • To open Computer Management, click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management.
  • You must be recognized as an administrator or a member of the Administrators group on your computer and on the computer you are managing to perform this task.

Via Microsoft

If broken it is, fix it you should

A while ago I was looking for an easy way to explain developers how to find and fix memory leaks. During my research I’ve found this really interesting blog by a Microsoft Engineer, Tess Ferrandez.

She is constantly posting new tips and guides on .NET development and troubleshooting. I really like the “.NET Debugging Labs”, step by step guides on how to fix common issues, such as Memory Leaks, CPU Hangs, Crashes and so on.

If broken it is, fix it you should:
http://blogs.msdn.com/tess/